Dalí Museum, Paris: A Review

Located in the heart of Montmarte, Paris, the Dalí Museum, or Espace Dalí, is home to the largest collection of art by Salvador Dalí in the entirety of France. Boasting over 300 original pieces, this pint-size museum contains sculptures, paintings, and drawings of all shapes and size. Everywhere you turn, your eyes are met with a smorgasbord of artwork, seemingly bending, melting, and transforming right under your gaze. I promise that you will be confounded in true Dalí-fashion, and you will leave satisfied, but slightly more perplexed than when you entered.

Time Required? Less than an hour. The museum itself is small square-foot wise, however, it is chockful of art everywhere you turn. It winds around, maze-like, on the bottom floor of the museum with stairs leading you down to begin your journey into Dalí’s universe, and stairs bringing you back up to end your adventure on the streets of Montmarte.

Game Plan? You’ve got no other choice than to plunge down the stairs into the creative, mind-bending, often-twisted world of the best known surrealist artist, Salvador Dalí.

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Admission? Open every day from 10am-6pm, open until 8:30pm during July and August. Free for kids under 8, otherwise tickets range from 9 euros for students to 12 euros for adults. Audio guides can be rented for 3 euros.

Kid Friendly? My inclination is to say no. If you haven’t already picked up on the fact that this museum is small, it is. There is literally little room, and the other patrons and museum staff will have little tolerance, for loud noises or flurried activity. In addition, sculptures are at various heights, and may look very “touchable” through the eyes of a child. With that being said, if your kids are well-behaved, will keep their voices down and hands to themselves, and can handle art with some shock-value, then by all means bring them along.  But, in general, I would not consider this a particularly kid-friendly establishment.

Bring a date? I wouldn’t recommend it for a first date, mostly since it’s a tiny museum: the other patrons will be within earshot at all times, and the quarters are rather close. However, if your date loves to discuss art, then this would be the place for you. Dalí is a master of symbolism and hidden messages, and his pieces are just itching to be analyzed.

Cafe? Not on site, however, there are plenty of cafes and shops nearby that are quite lovely.

Store? No.

Special Events? They host private events, but do not have many scheduled events that are open to the public.

Stars? 4/5. Initially, I was taken aback by how small the museum was in relation to the price (for comparison: the Louvre is gigantic and costs 15 euros). However, I did feel that I got my money’s worth considering the sheer range of art pieces on display. As someone who has frequented the much larger Dalí museum in St. Petersburg, Florida, I was impressed with how many new sculptures and paintings I saw in this Parisian location. As aforementioned, this museum feels a little claustrophobic and cramped at times, a fact sure to be exacerbated during tourist season. I also didn’t feel that the museum staff were especially warm or friendly, however, it is Paris after all; and I shouldn’t have been expecting anything less.

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Esclave de Michelin

Anything else I need to know? If so inclined, you can skip the line by purchasing tickets online and securing a timed entry slot. I visited in April, so I wasn’t there during the height of the tourist season, but if you’re visiting during the summer, this might not be a bad idea. Group and bulk ticketing options are also available online.

The only restroom on-site is towards the entrance of the museum, and there’s really only one way in and out of the museum, so if you need to use the loo, you’ll have to wind your way backwards until you find it. I had to ask the museum staff two times for directions in order to successfully locate it.

Be sure to catch the wall of whimsical quotes at the end of your visit.

Unlike most museums where the art is, and will never be for sale, if you’ve got the cash, you can actually purchase a piece by the artist (after filling out an inquiry form online beforehand). In addition, the staff provide special services for those lucky members of the public that believe themselves to be the owner of an original piece, and will answer questions and provide authentication services.

Website? https://www.daliparis.com/en

Address? 11 rue Poulbot, 75018 Paris. Located in the heart of the Montmarte District of Paris, the museum is a short walk from two Subway stations: Anvers (line 2), Abbesses or Lamarck-Caulaincourt (line 12). To locate the museum, follow directions toward “Place du Tertre”. Dalí Paris is approximately 100 feet from Place du Tertre.

A blog post with the history of the museum and additional photos can be found here:  The Good Life France

Disclaimer: My views are my own and do not reflect the opinion or position of the Dali Paris. I am not getting compensated in any way for this review.

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